Friday, July 19, 2013

Noah's Ark at UCLA

I recently received an email from the UCLA Film & Television Archive promoting an upcoming showing of a recently restored Noah's Ark.

According to their email/press release:

UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Hugh M. Hefner Classic American Film Program present


Saturday, July 27 @ 7:30 p.m.

“Archive Treasures” showcases works from UCLA Film & Television Archive’s extensive holdings, one of the largest moving image collections in the world.

Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive with funding from Turner Entertainment Company and AT&T.

Warner Bros.' dazzling Biblical epic from the transition era features a Vitaphone music and effects track with dialogue scenes added during the production. As with D.W. Griffith's Intolerance (1916), a parallel modern story frames the Old Testament tale, shot with exacting realism by director Michael Curtiz. (Legend has it that several extras drowned during the shooting of the flood sequence.) A roadshow version, now lost, ran 135 minutes but tonight we present the general release version, restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive in 2006.
35mm, b/w, silent with sync sound, 100 min.

IN PERSON: author Alan K. Rode.

VENUE: the Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood Village, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90024 (corner of Wilshire & Westwood Blvds., courtyard level of the Hammer Museum).

TICKETS: Advance tickets are available for $10 at

Tickets are also available at the Billy Wilder Theater box office starting one hour before showtime: $9, general admission; FREE to all UCLA students with valid ID; $8, other students, seniors and UCLA Alumni Association members with ID.

PARKING: at the Billy Wilder Theater for a $3 flat rate all day on the weekend. Enter from Westwood Blvd., just north of Wilshire.

INFO: / 310-206-FILM (-3456)

Lost Buster Keaton Footage

Slate has posted a video of lost Buster Keaton footage of a film titled The Blacksmith.

According to the brief article accompanying the video:

What makes this find so significant is that the lost version of The Blacksmith, which features French intertitles, is significantly different from the U.S. version. One sequence involving a horse is absent from the found footage, for example, though there are "never-before-seen gags" according to Variety, as well as a slightly altered ending, in the version Pena uncovered.

Watch the video